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ANT-Hiroshima Offers Interactive Lesson on Hibakujumoku

For many years, ANT-Hiroshima’s activities have included introducing hibakujumoku (A-bomb survivor trees) to both visitors and locals. In addition to tours of varying size and formality, often led by Arborist Chikara Horiguchi, ANT staff also give lectures and kamishibai (a form of picture-based storytelling) performances about hibakujumoku. Additionally, a certain ANT intern recently tested a new, interactive lesson for students.

The objective of the interactive lesson, as opposed to a normal tour, was to foster a feeling of ownership in the students: ownership of both their own learning process and of the hibakujumoku’s stories. Through first examining the trees by themselves — albeit with help from ANT staff, their teachers, and a packet of hints — the students formed their own conclusions as to what each tree was telling them about the atomic bombing.

Lecture, which miraculously ended on time, by ANT

The lesson, guinea pigged by a group of energetic students from the traveling high school Think Global School (TGS), took the following form:

  1. Introductory lecture by ANT-Hiroshima
  2. Independent investigation of hibakujumoku by students
  3. Presentation of hibakujumoku to the class

The introductory lecture had two goals: to share what hibakujumoku mean to Hiroshima citizens and survivors of the atomic bombing, and to familiarize students with what characteristics they might be looking for when they examine the trees themselves. The group was also told to come having watched a video testimony of hibakusha Suzuko Numata, whose story is deeply connected with the hibakujumoku Chinese parasol trees living in Peace Memorial Park.

One group of students examines a willow.

The class then left for Hiroshima Castle, where students split into four groups, each with their own hibakujumoku to get to know. A packet of hints was distributed to each group; the packet included a map, photos of the trees or area before or after the bombing (when available), and other relevant information tailored to each tree. Students had 40 minutes to examine their tree and plan a presentation introducing the tree to their classmates. Presentation guidelines included stating the direction of the hypocenter, positing which qualities of the tree they thought were an effect of the atomic bomb, and connecting their tree to something else they’d learned while in Hiroshima.

The whole group reassembled at one of the hibakujumoku and presentations began. After each group finished sharing, an ANT representative added to their findings or pointed out something they had missed. The students never failed to ask questions of their classmates or postulate their own theories as to why the hibakujumoku looked the way they did.

Students hotly debate the cause of the holly’s scars and wrinkles.

Although a few students had to leave immediately after the presentations, other stayed for a question and answer session with Arborist Chikara Horiguchi. Through the students’ questions, even ANT staff learned new facts and theories about the hibakujumoku at Hiroshima Castle. (Why had we never asked why that holly has roots on only one side?)

With this type of lesson, there was a chance that students would make mistaken assumptions about the trees that, unfortunately, could go uncorrected as the lively conversation raced ahead. However, their enthusiastic participation and the learning process ANT staff, teachers, and students all experienced during the lesson made the gamble worthwhile, and hopefully the students will continue inquisitively thinking about hibakujumoku.

If any readers are interested in participating in this kind of lesson, please feel free to contact ANT-Hiroshima. The first run with Think Global School gave us tips for how to keep improving, and we welcome new participants!

Literal tree-hugging unplanned but welcome.

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“One Day in Hiroshima” Book Available Online

International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War (IPPNW) recently made the book “One Day in Hiroshima: An Oral History” available online as a  free PDF. (The French version can be found here.) The book, written by former Hiroshima University Professor Nanao Kamada, M.D., M.Sc., and originally published in 2007, offers both a scientific and social introduction to the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. In the foreword, Professor Kamada wrote, “I hope this book helps you to understand the actual situation of the survivors.”

“One Day in Hiroshima” is organized as a series of questions to an unnamed, elderly hibakusha living in a nursing home specifically for survivors. One side of each page contains her response to a question, while the other side includes more in-depth information, including charts, statistics, and photos, about the subject.

Along with explaining the permanent physical and psychological effects of the atomic bombings — especially radiation — on people, “One Day in Hiroshima” also describes measures by national and local government to give medical support to hibakusha, including those living abroad. Finally, the book touches on how Hiroshima memorialized the bombing through the Peace Park and Museum, various monuments, and peace education.

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Roundup: ICAN Receives the Nobel Peace Prize

The International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN) received the 2017 Nobel Peace Prize in Oslo at the Award Ceremony on 10 December. ANT-Hiroshima, a longtime supporter of ICAN, organized or participated in a number of activities over the weekend to celebrate ICAN being awarded the Prize. But more than a celebration, the events were a chance to reflect on the decades of work by hibakusha and others — work that, in partnership with ICAN’s campaign, culminated in the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons — and to reaffirm our commitment to continuing to work for nuclear abolition.

Messages of support at the Hiroshima Joint Action event (photo by Takao Nakaoku)

The following are resources for those looking to learn more about ICAN and its campaign, as well as a short introduction to the activities of Hiroshima citizens held in conjunction with the Nobel Peace Prize Ceremony.

About ICAN, the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons, and the 2017 Nobel Peace Prize

  • ICAN recently released this document, which outlines the history of the organization and the steps leading up to the creation of the Treaty.
  • ICAN’s page on the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons outlines the Treaty’s content and provides links to its full text and signatories.
  • Watch ICAN Executive Director Beatrice Fihn’s and anti-nuclear activist and hibakusha Setsuko Thurlow’s speeches at the ceremony.

In Hiroshima

Emiko Okada speaks at the Hibakusha Voices event. (photo by Takeo Nakaoku)

Hibakusha Voices: On 9 December, Hibakusha Voices, an event organized by ANT-Hiroshima and held at Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum, gave Hiroshima citizens, and youth in particular, an opportunity to hear six hibakusha voice their thoughts on ICAN being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. The speakers shared some of their experiences as hibakusha, as well as called on younger generations to take on their stories and continue working for a nuclear-free world. Although they were pleased with ICAN’s Peace Prize and the creation of the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons, the majority of the speakers emphasized that the prize and the treaty represent the rebirth of their cause, not its ending.

Candle message to ICAN (photo by Takeo Nakaoku)

Candle Message: People of all ages from various organizations joined forces to send a candle message of support to ICAN. The event organizers, young people of Hiroshima (with financial support from ANT), intended the message of “ICAN with you” to convey both partnership with hibakusha and a call for everyone to join the international anti-nuclear movement. Participants and speakers from the Hibakusha Voices event also took part in the candle message group photo. Photos were shared on social media with the hashtag #YesICAN, and the event was also given both local and national media coverage. NHK World broadcast and posted online a news story about the event.

Hiroshima Joint Action: Representatives from a number of civil society organizations gathered in front of the Atomic Bomb Dome on 10 December to congratulate ICAN on its Peace Prize and affirm their continued support. The group took photos with three banners, which read “United with global people, let’s achieve a nuke-free world with nuclear ban treaty!” “Setsuko Thurlow, many thanks and cheers!” and “Congrats, ICAN, for nuclear ban treaty & receiving Nobel Peace Prize!” Speakers included students and members of civil society organizations.

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Model Toy Libraries as Peace Centers: Phase One of the Project Completed

In June of this year, I posted about ANT-Hiroshima partner Aldrin Bucoy Abdurahim’s project Model Toy Libraries as Peace Centers. The project aims to help children learn about peace and value education through having fun with educational toys. At the time, preparations for the project were in full swing; after three months of implementation, ANT-Hiroshima received word that this stage of the project has been successfully completed.

Aldrin’s NPO ABA Trainings Inc. created Toy Libraries in 20 schools in Zamboanga City, Philippines, using donations from ANT-Hiroshima, the Philippine Toy Library, and other organizations. The project will positively impact approximately 3,730 children across the 20 schools.

In the project report, Aldrin wrote a number of lessons learned, including, “Partnership is very important. Support from other peace practitioners doing similar advocacy will truly make the project more meaningful.”

He also said his team was able to turn setbacks into opportunities to increase their support network and learn to work more resourcefully.

There are many more schools interested in joining the project, and Aldrin is currently planning how to double its scope. ANT-Hiroshima wishes him and all involved luck as phase two commences!

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Hiroshima Citizens Collect Signatures for Nuclear Ban Treaty

ANT-Hiroshima supports the Hibakusha Appeal, an international signature campaign calling for the ratification of the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons by all nations.

However, rather than always focusing on the activities of NGOs, activists, or international organizations, today we would like to highlight the work of individual Hiroshima citizens who contribute to the campaign.

Kyōko Fujitaka

Kyōko Fujitaka works at an apparel shop in the Mitsukoshi department store. Two years ago, she began talking with Takako Morii, a regular customer and ANT-Hiroshima volunteer. Inspired by Morii-san’s stories of her work with The Clouds in Summer Won’t ForgetFujitaka-san felt she too wanted to do something for Hiroshima and peace.

Fujitaka-san (left) with Morii-san

Around the beginning of 2017, the two spoke about another peace activity Morii-san was participating in, the Hibakusha Appeal signature campaign. Fujitaka-san agreed to lend a hand. She asked family members, friends, coworkers, and regular customers to sign, as well as acquaintances from her job at a cosmetics company and people she met at work parties. When others wanted to participate, Fujitaka-san gave them blank forms so they could go collect signatures themselves.

Until then, Fujitaka-san had never participated in peace- or disarmament-related activities. She was born and raised in Hiroshima, and her mother and grandmother are hibakusha. Her grandfather, who worked near what is now the Atomic Bomb Dome, died the day of the bombing. Although her grandmother took her to ring the Peace Bell in Peace Memorial Park every summer, Fujitaka-san didn’t think seriously about the atomic bombing or her own connection to it until she was an adult.

Fujitaka-san said the vast majority of people she talks to about the Hibakusha Appeal agree to sign. To her, the strong point of a signature campaign is its simplicity. Everyone can participate. Fujitaka-san asks for signatures without going into too much detail about the campaign and without being part of any official group. She began her work because of her connection to Morii-san, and she believes people agree to sign from similarly simple motives — they are from Hiroshima, and they support nuclear disarmament.

Currently, Fujitaka-san has collected over 200 signatures. She humbly said she is not satisfied with that number, and she will continue doing what she can to support the campaign.

Mie Higashi and Yoshiko Tanaka

Higashi-san and Tanaka-san began collecting signatures two months ago, after ANT-Hiroshima Executive Director Tomoko Watanabe encouraged them participate in the campaign.

The pair run a hair salon in Hiroshima’s Misasa neighborhood, and Tomoko-san has been their client for the past 30 years. As one does at a salon, the three chatted whenever Tomoko-san would come for a haircut, and naturally the conversation would turn to work. After sharing that ANT-Hiroshima was supporting the Hibakusha Appeal campaign, Tomoko-san asked Higashi-san and Tanaka-san if they would participate too.

(From right to left) Higashi-san and Tanaka-san with Tomoko-san

Wishing to do more than just collect family members’ signatures, the two placed blank forms on the front counter of their salon. They ask regular customers, people they already have established relationships with, to sign. So far, no one has refused. Some offer to write the names of their family members as well, while others take home a form to share with acquaintances.

Like Fujitaka-san, this is the first time Higashi-san and Tanaka-san have participated in peace activities. When I asked, “Why now?” Higashi-san responded, “Because of Tomoko-san. We trust her.”

The two also think most people living in Hiroshima, no matter where they were born, would be willing to sign because peace-related issues are part of Hiroshima daily life. Whether or not to actively engage is up to the individual, but there’s no denying that peace education in schools, news coverage around August 6, and a host of other events and institutions have an impact on citizens’ consciousness and identity.

When asked whether they had anything else they wished to convey, Higashi-san and Tanaka-san looked pensive, then simply stated, “We don’t want war.”

 *    *   *

A signature campaign is largely built on trust. As Higashi-san and Tanaka-san pointed out, without it, no one would write their address on the petition form.

A simple act with simple motives is the heart of these citizens’ work. Any attempt there might have been on the part of the interviewer to fish for a more complex story or a hot take on activism was rebuffed. Trust built on personal relationships and the potential for cooperation therein was the message, loud and clear.

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Green Legacy Hiroshima